TOPSHIT PHOTOGRAPHY blog

borut peterlin, slovenia, ambrotype, Portrait photography, Wet Plate Collodion, Analog Film photography

Preserved Dry Collodion Plate process

with 2 comments

20131020_3159

Dry preserved collodon plate, exposure 75min, f/11 and exposure meter was showing about 9EV. This was done under tutorial of Jeroen de Wijs.

Dry preserved collodon plate, exposure 75min, f/11 and exposure meter was showing about 9EV. This was done under tutorial of Jeroen de Wijs.

Jeroen de Wijs a collodion photographer portrayed in Studio Pelikan by Borut Peterlin

Jeroen de Wijs a collodion photographer portrayed in Studio Pelikan by Borut Peterlin

This weekend a colleague Jeroen de Wijs visited me. He is a collodion photographer from Holland with outstanding knowledge and experience in collodion photography. He was learning collodion photography from Mark Osterman and France Scully Osterman at group and individual workshops. We’ve visited Studio Pelikan and today he thought me how to do dry preserved collodion negative. This process is much more complicated than ambrotype and tintype so not many people knows it and even less practice it. The major advantage is that dry collodion plates can be prepared at home and they need to be exposed and processed in about month or two time. The disadvantage is that plates have very low sensibility for light. Like the plate that I’m publishing was exposed for 75 minutes at a cloudy day at aperture f/11. OK, I was using very old, four months old collodion negative, that it could be considered as a dead collodion, but if I would use young collodion, it would still take about 15 minutes. Dry plate collodion was the medium that made it possible to photograph interiors of churches and other buildings, with exposure times for a whole day. As you probably guessed the dry collodion plates process is suitable for landscape photography, not for portraits. At the end of the day I’ve made a salt print from the negative and I call it a very good day ;-)

PS: In two weeks I’m going to Rochester to George Eastman House for a carbon printing workshop. So exciting!!!

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2 Responses

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  1. I love this! I’m actually saving up to follow a dry plate workshop from Jeroen; it offers a lot of potential for making plates on the more far away trips where wet plate would not be an option. Looks like you had a fun time! Love the salt print too, want to learn it as well. Jeroen is one of the best teachers out there, certainly of the Netherlands. Have fun on your carbon workshop; you’re going fast!

    Best,

    Indra

    Contrastique

    28 October, 2013 at 12:44

  2. Indra, daaaarling, I agree completely. Jeroen is the man in collodion world. Perhaps he’s not as loud as some of us are, but when you talk to him you realize that he knows everything. Beside dry collodion he showed me also little tricks with wet plate. You know, like how to hold the plate when wiping back, how to put it the plateholder so it does not get too much contamination and so on. Only now I know I realize how huge effects those little tricks have!
    I will certainly have fun next week ;-)
    Topshit happens,
    B5

    Borut Peterlin

    29 October, 2013 at 09:09


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