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Photography, Fine Art, Wet Plate Collodion, Alternative photography

Archive for the ‘dry collodion’ Category

Albumen print from European Collodion Weekend

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An albumen print toned with gold from a 10x12" wet plate collodion negative of a group of collodion artists at European Collodion Weekend in Eindhoven, NL.

An albumen print toned with gold from a 10×12″ wet plate collodion negative of a group of collodion artists at European Collodion Weekend in Eindhoven, NL.

HERE is a link to the highres of the reproduction of the albumen print.

The first week of May I’ve joined European Collodion Weekend in Eindhoven, NL. It’s an opportunity to meet collodion photographers from all over the world. Tarmo Virves drove all the way from Estonia. That’s 2100 km drive in one way! In comparison to him, I was lucky, I had only 1250 km of road to drive one way. Still it was super exhausting, but it was worth all the trouble. It’s a perfect opportunity to at least once a year meet many of my wet plate collodion colleagues and do together what we love to do, wet plate collodion photography. Thank you Alex Timmermans for organizing and I look forward of seeing you again next year! And thank you for fascinating »Howgh, ich habe gesprochen« portrait of me! Next year I will make one of you 😉

Melanie Fraser made this video of me taking a portrait of Sherpa. It’s published only on Facebook so I hope you have access to it. HERE is an album from Henk Peters. And HERE is a link to an album done by Ferry “The President! van der Vliet.

Also this year there were with us models Sabrina, Wilma, Sherpa and Ruth. I took their portraits and enjoyed every second of working with those guys. I was shooting only negatives, although the first test plate was so underexposed it turned out as a decent ambrotype. I’m publishing three out of five photographs I’ve made. I’m doing albumen prints and this process takes time.

On Sunday we did a group portrait and with a generous help of Christian Klant I’ve managed to prepare one plate and took a group portrait. I was lucky to guessed the perfect exposure time and when I was developing I haven’t lost ten drops of developer, thus keeping maximum silver on the plate and resulting topshit density of the negative. This weekend I’ve made three albumen prints. The HIRES of the albumen print is available on THIS LINK. You can download it and print it for your own collection. It’s free to use it for non-commercial use. There are no model-release form signed, so it’s intended for only personal archive.

If you want to buy an original albumen print I can print it for you. The size of the contact print is 10×12″, that’s 25x30cm. To achieve archival quality of the print it’s toned with gold-chloride and washed with Ilford Washaid (among other steps of the process). I’m selling it for 70 EUR + 10 EUR shipping. If you are interested, mail me on borut@borutpeterlin.com.

At the event I was selling my prints and I’ve sold four! I actually covered all my expenses of the trip. Further more, when I was driving south I stopped in Nürnberg at Peter Kunz and give him a crash course on dry collodion. Although we had only few hours and deliberately we’ve chosen impossible motive to photograph, we’ve made a good dry collodion negative! It’s a step test, on the left it’s underexposed on right it’s overexposed, but the dynamic range of collodion negatives is V.A.S.T. so you have Spotmeter was showing on the darkest part of the black shoe 8.5EV and on the metal part of the camera was 15.0 EV, sky was 15.5EV. Everything was there. Considering that we had few hours to do it from scratch, I call that a success. Peter Kunz is infected with collodion negative fever 😉

I’m planning five days workshop on wet plate collodion negative, dry plate collodion negative, albumen and salt printing in Berlin. More details will follow, but you are the first to know 😉

Sunday is a good and dry collodion day

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A scan of a dry collodion negative. Exposure 25 minutes at f/5.6.  (I could make it faster by 1.5 f stop)

A scan of a dry collodion negative. Exposure 25 minutes at f/5.6.
(I could make it faster by 1.5 f stop)

Today it was Sunday. It still is, but concerning the the speed of my writing it will take me two hours and it will be past midnight. Again… So where to start. Basically I’m using this free time that I have during holidays for researching processes, equipment and aesthetic. Very soon I’m planning to go to Bosnia for a test shoot on a new project I’m preparing. In 2015 there will be 20th anniversary of the end of the war in Bosnia and I want to prepare an exhibition on the topic.

OK, let’s start with the new member of my family. Please read captions of my images, this post will be more in telegraphic style.

Charconnet Petzval:
I bought a petzval lens! Gasc & Charconnet Paris Vintage lens is less known and less expensive than Dallmeyer or Hermagis but it’s in the same quality range. Made in years around 1860’s. So now I’m playing around, see what the baby have to offer. Please read the captions and you’ll see what images are done with the lens. Most of them.

Carbon Printing
I’m so much in love with carbon prints! it’s amazing! I love it.

Dry Preserved Collodion Negatives
As much as I love the idea of not carrying all the chemistry and a darkroom around, the dry collodion is not a shortcut. You spend ten times as much time to process one plate. Just developing of a single plate that I’ve shot today it took me literally an hour! That being said, it’s very useful tool to have in my assortiment of expression.

PS: That chopped down tree was cut by a beaver. It’s amazing, that this animals that are almost extinct are living literally in downtown of Dolenjske Toplice! Look carefully the last image, you’ll see that the beaver chewed whole trunk! So cool!

Preserved Dry Collodion Plate process

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Dry preserved collodon plate, exposure 75min, f/11 and exposure meter was showing about 9EV. This was done under tutorial of Jeroen de Wijs.

Dry preserved collodon plate, exposure 75min, f/11 and exposure meter was showing about 9EV. This was done under tutorial of Jeroen de Wijs.

Jeroen de Wijs a collodion photographer portrayed in Studio Pelikan by Borut Peterlin

Jeroen de Wijs a collodion photographer portrayed in Studio Pelikan by Borut Peterlin

This weekend a colleague Jeroen de Wijs visited me. He is a collodion photographer from Holland with outstanding knowledge and experience in collodion photography. He was learning collodion photography from Mark Osterman and France Scully Osterman at group and individual workshops. We’ve visited Studio Pelikan and today he thought me how to do dry preserved collodion negative. This process is much more complicated than ambrotype and tintype so not many people knows it and even less practice it. The major advantage is that dry collodion plates can be prepared at home and they need to be exposed and processed in about month or two time. The disadvantage is that plates have very low sensibility for light. Like the plate that I’m publishing was exposed for 75 minutes at a cloudy day at aperture f/11. OK, I was using very old, four months old collodion negative, that it could be considered as a dead collodion, but if I would use young collodion, it would still take about 15 minutes. Dry plate collodion was the medium that made it possible to photograph interiors of churches and other buildings, with exposure times for a whole day. As you probably guessed the dry collodion plates process is suitable for landscape photography, not for portraits. At the end of the day I’ve made a salt print from the negative and I call it a very good day 😉

PS: In two weeks I’m going to Rochester to George Eastman House for a carbon printing workshop. So exciting!!!