TOPSHIT PHOTOGRAPHY blog

Photography, Fine Art, Wet Plate Collodion, Alternative photography

Posts Tagged ‘Photography

Two collodion workshops in the centre of the world!

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Ciao tutti,
here is a video on location scouting around my town of Dolenjske Toplice, Slovenia, EU. I’m planning to make two collodion workshops, a basic and advanced one. Please check the link on my site for detailed program.

I’m embedding also a video from the workshop that I had in Berlin, about a year ago where I’ve explained the content of the workshop.

At 5am in Venice

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Few weeks ago I had a job in Venice and I couldn’t resist not to do some 5am photography. 5am is one of my favourite projects. The basic concept is to be a part of the day when night had finish already and the day haven’t started yet.

Sometime around 5am there exists a subtle moment when day chases its tail. Laborers are off to work; party-goers are finding their way home.

In the wee hours, ambiguity rages between night and day, light and dark, predator and prey, mind and instinct, life and death. This surreal relationship between contrasts seems to linger in what is just the blink of an eye.

In one sentence, it’s a love affair with light. I love it, being awake before everybody and having an eternity just for myself. I walk and observe without any rush, without any obligations and without any expectations whatsoever. It’s my walking meditation channeled trough photography.

As I’ve mentioned in the video I’ve started the project in Fabrica in year 2000, because after Oliviero Toscani left, I could not get a permission to go out and do photography. My kind of photography! You know, the kind of photography that does not sound sane in an application form and on top of that it does not have a deadline or a goal to achieve? I remember very clearly when a senior staff was explaining me that I should sketch how will my photographs look like, before I take a camera in my hands. I explaining him that if I would do so, I would make an image that is made with my mind and my mind is just recycling concepts and in this way I can not come up with nothing original. You can imagine the face of the temporary head of the department…

Anyhow, in the video above is presented a book dummy that I’ve created in 2008. After that I was doing my 5am routine wherever I traveled and bellow there are few recent images from Lithuania, Poland, Slovenia, USA, Czech Republic and of course Venice, Italy.

The project will be finished in a book, I’m quite certain about it. You might remember that in my post from Les Recontres Arles festival I’ve mentioned that Dewi Lewis remembered me for some crazy project of mine? In one sentence I’ve met Mr. Lewis more then ten years ago at Frankfurt Book Fair and after all those years he still remembered me and one of my crazy projects. He remembered my 5am project! How amazing is that?!?

To repeat fast, Dewi Lewis is one of the most important photography book publishers in the world and he was a publisher of Martin Parr (before Faidon), William Klein, Erwin Olaf, to name just few and he remembered my 5am project ten years later when we’ve met in Arles. Of course I will make new 5am book dummy and send it to him.

If you will be in Vienna Photo Book Festival I will be there also with my photo books. That said, the book isn’t published yet, so I can’t sell you one, but someday I will.

Bellow are images that I’ve made in Venice. This is my selection from couple of mornings and only few images will actually end in a book. At the bottom there is a slideshow I’ve made years ago with music of Daniel Wehr. Daniel was a fellow student in Fabrica.it in year 2000 and he made this music for my 5am project. He even walked with me one 5am morning, recording sound, but he didn’t like the sound of camera shutter, so next day I got up even sooner at 4am :-)

Written by Borut Peterlin

6 April, 2015 at 11:58

Honouring elderly photographers

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My neighbour Rajko Henigman is 87 years old and he was a photographer and cinema operator. His father Karel Henigman was a shoemaker and an amateur photographer who created amazing collection of photographs during the first world war. In the our little town of Dolenjske Toplice is a spa but during the first world war it was a rehabilitation centre for soldiers and Karel Henigman documented daily life of soldiers, during their exercise, rehabilitation, hospitals, preparing food and so on. Very impressive silver-gelatine glass plate negatives formats from 9x12cm to 18x24cm. Rajko is the keeper of his father heritage and he asked me not to photograph his fathers negatives.

Rajko was curios how am I enlarging my glass plate negatives, so I invited him to my darkroom and enlarged a portrait of him that I’ve done some time ago. He said my technique of dodging and burning is the same as he was doing it when he was young. He show me some tips and we enjoyed our time together.

Borut Peterlin and Božena Pelikan in front of Studio Pelikan

Borut Peterlin and Božena Pelikan in front of Studio Pelikan

Some time ago I’ve visited Božena Pelikan, 93 year old youngest daughter of Josip Pelikan. I wrote a post about the Josip Pelikan few years ago, but this time she showed me the other facilities that Josip Pelikan was using after second world war until his death in 1977. What a privilege to enter the rooms of a great photographer, seeing how he worked, how much have he created. I could feel his presence in the coat that was still hanging on the door where he left it in 1977.

It’s an honour for me to pay tribute to elderly photographers. They are inspiration. I hope in the future I could make a series of art images with these objects. I hope I can make a sort of a conversation with photographs between three photographers, the present one, the deceased one and the one that is not born yet, but will look at the images sometime in the future.

Do you understand? A photographer who is not born yet will look at my images that are not created yet, but when he/she will look at it will have a feeling that they are here from forever. When we look at the old images we have a feeling they are here because someone has left them, but no, they are here because someone created them and the other preserved them. Photographs in front of you are not dusty objects, they are someones intention.

Written by Borut Peterlin

31 January, 2015 at 23:49

Thoughts on photography: Breaking the rules – what a stupid cliche…

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IMG_20141122_105014521_HDR I’ve bought a Land Rover 109, year 1972, an old-timer. It took me more than a month to fix (almost) everything and the last thing was changing the tires. Last Friday I’ve registered and insured the car and went on the road to buy new tires. I took a short cut to Ljubljana, through forest, I mean that’s where Land Rovers are at home, but a maniac crashed in me with a Mitsubishi pick-up truck. He was speeding as hell and I couldn’t steer my car away, since the old-timer does not have a servo steering system or ABS brakes. The other car steered in the hill and then bounced back in me, crashing sideways. Look at the damage the impact caused with sideways crashing. And that’s a Land Rover not plastic fantastic car! The pick-up truck took another 30 meters before he could stop. Imagine what would happen if we would crash head to head… Luckily this did not happen and nobody was hurt. The very next moment a peculiar thought came into my mind, totally irrational in the context of the event:

Damn it, your life almost suddenly ended and until now you’ve published only one book! Only one fucking book!!! Who will publish all of your beloved book dummies if you don’t care to bother?!?

Books that I've done with my photography. These are mainly handmade books.

Books that I’ve done with my photography. These are mainly handmade books.

I think a book is a perfect medium for my photography and so in the middle of a forest, at completely inappropriate time I’ve made a resolution to start publishing my books, starting right now by writing down some thoughts on photography. I mean that was the initial purpose of this sketch book of mine, the Topshit Photography BlogOriginal since 2006! ON BREAKING RULES… Breaking the rules is such a stereotype in our world. I’ve just googled the expression and it came down to about 217 million hits. I haven’t clicked trough all the 217 million sites, but the general understanding of the expression differs very much from my understanding! What are rules? Metaphorically speaking rules are like crutches. A person who can not walk use crutches to gain more support and crutches take weight from his legs to his hands, increasing balance. If you were one of the lucky ones who had never been seriously injured you don’t have a clue how difficult and complex activity is to start walking again. Walking is basically a continues fall. Imagine you’ve managed to stand up on your two feet. Fantastic, indescribable feeling that only champions can feel. The bad news is that if you want to start walking you need to lose balance by leaning forward, start falling forward, with one leg catch the fall, lift your body up into balance and then again leaning forward loosing balance and catching the fall with the other leg. Basically you are juggling with your balance while (usually) being in great pain. Crutches are your best friends :-) Once the person know how to walk again can use a simple walking stick and later start walking without. If the person wants to run or dance, can not do it with crutches! The same principle applies also to rules in photography. Rules and exercises in composition and aesthetics are like crutches. It helps you to focus, to gradually learn basics and then when the time comes, you put the crutches gratefully down and start learning the dance of creativity. I know photographers who could put down the crutches, but they do not. The crutches are the spine of their work. Then they start to judge the art through the prism of their crutches. That’s fine, that’s a necessary stage in an evolution of every artist. The true problem appears when a photographer start believing his story filtered through the prism of his crutches, mocking some people and uncritically following others. I get an allergic reaction when I see a debate in the line of thought “What is art?” I read and hear many times about the success stories of breaking the rules. In my ears that sounds so pathetic as an athlete would go in hospital and start breaking crutches because he does not need them. And that is actually a certain modus vivendi in contemporary art work – Let’s brake rules! Artist whose work was conceived with a motif of breaking rules is actually putting the rules that were meant to be broken as the fundament of the work. And there is nothing wrong with that! My bottom-line is that if you start the dance, don’t do it so you could brake your crutches, do it as the next step in your process of learning how to perform the miracle of moving through time and space. It’s so much more fun and free!

PS: the bottom line is that rules in any craft are like crutches. Crutches are not meant to be for dancing or for walking. They are for learning.

Written by Borut Peterlin

29 November, 2014 at 21:02

I developed a new behavior disorder – Land Rover 109, year 1972

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Last week I’ve bought a “new” car, Land Rover 109, Station Wagon, model year 1972. It used to be imported in Yugoslavia (RIP) in 1982, serving as a firefighter’s car and in 1999 was a gift for a fiftieth birthday of a car mechanic which restored it entirely but never registrate it, so it was standing in a garage for last fifteen years. Last week I’ve bought it. In two weeks I’m turning forty and this is a gift and a tool I bought myself. Otherwise I hate cars. If I could I would rather spend hours on bicycle or running to do my travelings, but I can’t. If I need a car, I wanted to buy a car that is not boring and let’s face it, cars are boring as hell! They all look the same and the mantra of consumerism is “comfort über alles”. Guess what? COMFORT IS OVERRATED! And on top of that comfort is booooooooring to death!!!!!!

An ambrotype format 10x12" (25-30cm).

An ambrotype format 10×12″ (25-30cm).

A collector asked me if I’m selling ambrotypes, I don’t, because they are unique and I want to leave behind me a work that will tell a story. If I sell an ambrotype, that image will be on somebody’s wall and I and anybody else will never see it again. That is one of the reason I’ve chosen wet plate negative in my artistic career. But on the end of the day, I am a professional artist, I do this for a living, it’s not my weekend hobby, so I need to sell my artwork too. So I’ve been thinking and I came to this business model.

When I’m making my collodion landscape plates, I make two or three plates of the same motif and so if a person want’s to buy an ambrotype from me, he or she have two options:
Either pick it up from a gallery (that I’ve haven’t set up yet) and pay for the full price of an ambrotype 10×12″ that will be US $999.
Or the second option is that she or he can pre order a plate from me, so when I go next time out to do my art, I make another plate for the buyer. In this case the buyer can not choose a plate of his choice, it can only take the one I’ve made that day or decline it, no questions asked. The price in that case is less than half of it, US $399.

Sounds like a good and fair game right? Yes, I know, I would rather not be in a position that I need to sell my ambrotypes, but if you develop two habits like myself, you need to find a way to feed them!

My email is borutpeterlin@gmail.com and my website is www.borutpeterlin.com

PS: In my life I had several cars. They were all boring to death, except my very first car, Renault 4.

A portrait of myself from year 1998 by Jože Suhadolnik.  That's my first car, Renault 4. The sticker was real and it goes:  THIS CAR IS DRIVEN BY: and my signature.

A portrait of myself from the year 1998 by Jože Suhadolnik. That’s my first car, Renault 4. The sticker was real and it goes:
THIS CAR IS DRIVEN BY: and my signature.

 

The revival and the modernisation of woodburytype process – I DID IT!!!

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About a year ago I went to George Eastman House for a workshop of Carbon print process. To be honest before my arrival to Rochester, USA, I didn’t know what carbon print process is but if it was described as the king of all printing processes ever invented and I thought I might try it out. My main goal was to do the pilgrimage to George Eastman House and take a workshop under tutorship of Mark Osterman.

As I’ve expected the visit to GEH did blown my mind, I’ve seen original authentic prints of Julia Margaret Cameron, Eadweard Muybridge and many others. Mark Osterman shown us many gems of technical and aesthetic heritage from the history of photography. One of the things that stuck with me for the whole year was woodburytype process. Please take a look of the video at the bottom of this post, I’ve seen it so many times, I could repeat the words by heart!

Anyhow, down to the point, for the whole year I was thinking how to revive the woodburytype process. I have this vision to make my book in woodburytype process. The question why (almost) nobody (?) have done it in the last 120 years is obvious, it’s the most complicated process ever! For an 8×10″ print (20x25cm) you would need a press that would produce a pressure of about 500 tons per 8×10″ format! In 19th Century there were only two woodburytype presses in the world that were capable of making woodburytype prints size 8×10″.  I will not go into technical details, it’s beautifully explained in the video below.

When I told to Mark Osterman what is my vision, he advise me to stay away from authentic woodburytype process, but rather go for Stanotype process. What is Stanotype process I wondered? It’s another invention by Walter Bentley Woodbury (British, 1834–1885) with the same result, just it does not require those huge press to make a mold, that I’ve mentioned before. I’ve read everything I could about it, even Mark Osterman and Nick Brandreth were so kind to send me a digital copy of Stanotype manual written by Woodbury himself!

Last half a year I was working a lot. I knew that authentic Stanotype is not the answer, I knew I could modernize the process. And I did! On the images above are four (modernized) woodburytype prints and a carbon print on glass. The carbon print on glass has very little pigment and it’s made in a way to maximize the relief from which I’ve made a mold and from that mold I’ve made those prints.

Before you will make a judgement about my prints, let me explain that you need a press to achieve a good print from a woodburytype mold. The press that Mark Osterman is using in the video below. I don’t have one. At the moment I was just testing different materials and different processes. I’ve made one mold and today I was playing around with it. I didn’t had the press, so I’ve used these clamps, what’stheycalled. As you can tell I was speculating, changing parameters and the forth print is perfect! Well, it’s perfect, much better than I could ever thought in given circumstances! Because I was not using a press, but clamps, the pressure was not even, so the resulting print has patches of highlights and patches of black. But that doesn’t matter! What it matters is that I’ve made a modern woodburytype print from scratch and the result has blacks, it has highlights, it has contrast and it does have sharpness!!! I’ve learned all the crucial steps how to manipulate the process and created a modern woodburytype print!

I totally understand that perhaps you do not see anything special in these experiments of mine, but I’m just as excited as I was when I was 11 years old, learning photography with my dad’s russian Kiev camera, which light-meter was showing very wrong meterings, so every photograph that I took and I could recognize a motif being photographed, I considered a triumph!!! And that’s the case here! Perhaps you just see a bad print, but I see woodbury process revived and modernized, I see a printing house that will be the best printing house in the world and the first book printed in that printing house it will be my The Great Depression project. I even see an option how to do woodburytype prints from a digital file and furthermore in color and that is why in a month or so I’m flying back to Rochester to bring my modern woodburytype molds and compare them with authentic woodburytype molds from 19th Century.

Oh, I’m so happy, my buttocks are applauding!

PS: It’s too early for explaining how I’ve made the mold. I have to nail down the process entirely and finish with testing. I have three more concepts to test how to make a mold and then pick the best one. This was my first attempt.

PPS: I’m sure there are few individuals who are still doing woodburytype nowadays, but beside Oliver Barret, whose book was a help and inspiration in my research, I haven’t found anybody who would nowadays produce woodburytype kind of quality images. If you could help me finding other contemporary woodburytypes, I would be greatful.

Written by Borut Peterlin

29 October, 2014 at 01:19

A presentation of an ambrotype for an art fair

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An ambrotype packed in a box for Art Photo Budapest. The plates is from my project The Great Depression. The plates will be represented by Photon Gallery. Hopefully they will be sold.

An ambrotype packed in a box for Art Photo Budapest. The plates is from my project The Great Depression. The plates will be represented by Photon Gallery. Hopefully they will be sold.

Next week there will be an art fair in Budapest and my work will be presented by Gallery Photon. I was thinking how should I present my ambrotypes in a way that could be purchased. So here it is. The box is from Hahnemuhle acid free material. On 11th of October 2014 I will be a guest of a discussion panel how to survive as an artist. Guess what will I talk about? YOU! My topshit followers that is bidding on my ebay auctions. See you in Budapest on Saturday at 3pm!

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